Top 10 Least Densely Populated Places in the World

Greenland (0.03 people per km2):

Most of Greenland is covered in ice, so the population resides mainly along the west coast, where a lack of glacial cover gives way to a rocky coastline. With a population of just 56,000, Greenland is our number-one recommended spot if you want to feel like you've left it all behind.

Greenland
Greenland

Svalbard and Jan Mayen (0.04 people per km2):

Svalbard and Jan Mayen are both islands found off the north coast of Norway. Extremely remote and bitterly cold, they are two of the world's least densely populated places. Even though Svalbard has a land are of over 60,000 kilometers squared, it has a population of only 2,667. Jan Mayen is much smaller, with a land area of around 377 square kilometers. However, it does not have a population at all.

Svalbard and Jan Mayen
Svalbard and Jan Mayen

Falkland Islands (0.28 people per km2):

The Falklands are an archipelago comprised of 778 islands, with a total human population of 3,398. The two main islands, West & East Falkland, are untouched breeding grounds for a variety of birds, meaning there are more penguins than people on the Falklands. The landscape is hilly and mountainous, and the islands have a cold, windy and humid climate. A 10-week war was fought over the islands between the UK and Argentina in 1982, resulting in the UK keeping hold of the territory.

Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands

Pitcairn Islands (1.06 people per km2):

The Pitcairn Islands, another of the world's most remote inhabited locations which for some reason belong to the United Kingdom, are found in the far South Pacific. Only one of the four volcanic islands, Pitcairn, is inhabited, with a population of 50 and a density of 1.06 people per square kilometer. Indeed, the 50 people descend from four original colonizing families. Much of the Pitcairn islands are inaccessible, or difficult to access, due to high limestone cliffs covered in sharp coral that form a barrier to the more inhabitable interior

Pitcairn Islands 
Pitcairn Islands 

Tristan da Cunha (1.18 people per km2):

A chain of volcanic islands in the South Atlantic, Tristan da Cunha has the designation of being the most remote inhabited archipelago in the world. Obviously, it is a British Overseas Territory. Located roughly halfway between South America and Africa, Tristan is home to only around 246 people, all of whom live on the main island. Although the island is only around 200km2 in size, Tristan da Cunha is still one the world's least densely populated places.

Tristan da Cunha
Tristan da Cunha

Mongolia (2.04 people per km2):

The difficulty in occupying much of the landscape, coupled with the fact that it is bordered by both Russia and China, go a long way in justifying Mongolia's low population density. However, a rapidly-growing population could change this nation's ranking in the coming years. Winter in Mongolia sees winds blowing in from Siberia, making Ulaanbaatar the world's coldest capital with an average temperature of -1.3 degrees Celsius.

Mongolia 
Mongolia 

Western Sahara (2.13 people per km2):

Western Sahara is a disputed territory located in North-West Africa's Maghreb region. It is one of the world's least densely populated regions, mostly due to the fact that most of its terrain is an inhospitable desert. With a staggering land area of 266,000 square kilometers, the territory has a population of just half a million, giving it a population density of around 2.13 people for every square kilometer.

Western Sahara
Western Sahara

Namibia (2.97 people per km2):

This Southwestern African country sits on the Atlantic Ocean and borders similarly-sparsely populated Botswana to the East. The last census put its population density at 2.97 people per square km. In spite of the fact most of the country is covered with desert, it has a fairly temperate climate due to its higher altitudes.

Namibia
Namibia

Australia (3.25 people per km2):

There are roughly 25 million Aussies, but spread them over the world's largest island and you get one of the world's lowest population densities. However, most Australians aren't living spread out in the wilderness, they live in the cities that hug the coast. This ring of urbanisation circles a vast expanse – the Australian Outback – a huge desert known as more of a travel destination than an inhabitable landmass.

Australia
Australia

Iceland (3.5 people per km2):

Iceland is situated just below the Arctic Circle. The summer nights are bright with 24-hour daylight, and then in winter Iceland is one of the best places on the planet to see the northern lights. It has a population of around 362,860, 63% of which can be found around the capital Reykjavík. Today, Iceland has a healthy population growth on par with other European countries.

Iceland 
Iceland 

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